Books

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A JOYFUL HARVEST

A Joyful Harvest tells the story of Jewish life in southern Alberta from 1889 to 2005, beginning with the early pioneers who came from distant lands to the southern most reaches of what was then the Northwest Territories.

ALBERTA, FORMERLY A PART OF THE NORTHWEST TERRITORIES: AN INDEX TO BIRTH, MARRIAGE AND DEATH

An Index to Birth, Marriage and Death Registrations Prior to 1900.

 

ALBERTA'S FRANCOPHONES

This collection of photographs culled from various archival holdings throughout the province is animated by the author's desire to pay homage to the French-speaking men and women who have left their imprint on the history of Alberta.

ALBERTA'S GOVERNMENT HOUSE

In October of 1913, George Hedley Vicars Bulyea, Alberta's first lieutenant governor, celebrated the completion of Government House by throwing a grand fete, to which he invited Albertans from all walks of life. It was easy to imagine in those early days that the stately mansion, arguably the most imposing in the relatively new province of Alberta, would always serve as a vice-regal residence, given its luxury and grandeur. A mere 25 years later, however, this role ended and the world events would cast their shadow on Alberta, and the building would be called into a less glamourous kind of duty.

AT FIRST GLANCE

These portraits offer a close-up view of people who, in point of fact, are impossibly distant from us. More than thirty years of day after day has long since transformed them into whatever they were to become. Yet here they are in clear black and white, still mysteriously present. The images in Denis Wall's album expose flashes of tenderness and self-absorption, desire and love, optimism and pain. As you walk these streets with him, you are certain to find yourself in the frame.

 

BRUTINEL: LE REMARQUABLE DESTIN D'UN FRANCAIS, BRIGADIER-GENERAL DE L'ARMEE CANADIENNE

L'extraordinaire chronique d un citoyen français, Brigadier-Général dans l armée canadienne. Brutinelest la biographie fascinante d un immigrant français en Alberta, Canada, relatée par des amis intimes de la famille, Dominique et Jacques Baylauq. Au début des années 1900, avant de s engager dans l Armée canadienne et de mettre sur pied la Brigade motorisée de mitrailleuses, une force tactique nouvelle de la guerre moderne, il apporta une contribution importante à la jeune province, travaillant comme éditeur de journal, arpenteur et bâtisseur de chemin de fer. Le livre contient des transcriptions d entrevues de la Canadian Broadcasting Corporation avec Brutinel à propos de son service durant la Première Guerre mondiale.

 

BRUTINEL: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF A FRENCH CITIZEN BRIGADIER-GENERAL IN THE CANADIAN ARMY

Raymond Brutinel was born into an old family from Alet-lesbains, in South-East of France. At the age of 16 he abandoned his studies to travel around the world on some of the last sailing ships. After his military service in Tarbes in the South-West of France, he left with his wife and son and settled in Edmonton Alberta, in 1905. He quickly prospered pursuing numerous activities in journalism, prospecting and finance. His keen interest in military strategy, coupled with his passion for history inspired him to create, in Canada, at the outset of the WWI, the first autonomous motorized machine gun unit.

 

DAIRIES OF EDMONTON 1905-1955

A Historical account of the dairies of Edmonton from 1905-1955.

DAL & RICE

In 1914 Godfrey Davis arrived in India, a Junior officer in the Indian Civil Service. When he reluctantly returned to England thirty years later he was a high court judge with a knighthood and a great love for India. He sympathized with the independence movement and shared a mutual admiration and friendship with Mahatma Gandhi.

 

Wendy Davis inherited this affection for India and its people. In Dal and Rice she chronicles the memories of her childhood and offers a poignant and measured character study of her father. Her story is part social history, part travelogue, but mostly a very personal account of a relationship with an exotic, chaotic, and often mysterious country.

 

Avoiding political or ideological perspectives, Wendy Davis has written a fascinating memoir that depicts an extraordinary childhood and a vanished way of life.

 

ESCAPE FROM GERMANY

Out of the ten thousand British Air Force prisoners who were in permanent camps in Germany in the Second World War, less than thirty ever reached Britain or neutral territory, despite the most energetic and highly-organized attempts. Even so, for many prisoners of war, the arguments in favour of trying to escape were overwhelming.

This book contains the true and often incredible stories of the heroic efforts of the members of the RAF and the Army who tried to escape from prisoner of war camps in Germany.

This authoritative account of their many exploits, drawn from the narratives of the men themselves, makes compelling reading.

 

EVER-WIDENING CIRCLES

A history of St. Stephen's College, this book tells the stories, not only of the college and the theological students and the faculty who have worked there, but also of the high school, university and nursing students who, for many years, called the college residence home.

HER VOICE HER CENTURY

Celebrate the trailblazing women of Alberta's past! Pick up a copy of Her Voice, Her Century, written by three local authors, including one of our very own Reference Archivists   Karen Simonson! This book of four short plays draws from a rich variety of articles, private letters and court transcripts   enhanced by a variety of photographs from the Archives collection.

 

JAMES BOND STEELE DIARIES

Published in 2018 to commemorate the thirtieth anniversary of the Highlands Historical Society of Edmonton, the James Bond Steele Diaries follow the daily life of the one room schoolteacher who taught the children of settlers in early Edmonton, including what is now the Highlands neighbourhood.

 

KING COAL: A SOCIAL HISTORY OF COAL MINING IN ALBERTA

"King Coal" presents the rich history of Alberta coal mining and the people and culture that emerged out of the industry, from the 1870s through to the modern era. Discover Alberta's rich coal history, including its triumphs, tragedies, and the legacy that continues in the province today.

MON JOURNAL: THE JOURNAL AND MEMOIR OF FATHER LEON DOUCET O.M.I. 1868 TO 1890

The journal of Father Léon Doucet presents a rare account of the changes that occurred in what is today Saskatchewan and Alberta in the last half of the nineteenth century. These changes included the spread of devastating disease epidemics, the decline of bison populations, the end of the fur trade economy, the establishment of Canadian sovereignty, the signing of treaties, and the creation of First Nationsreserves, and the transformation of the landscape into an agricultural west. A keen observer, Doucet recorded significant ethnographic, geographic, genealogical, faunal, floral, and meteorological details and events.

 

NEVER MARRY AN ENGLISHMAN

In 1899, the Counterfeit Circulation Company Limited is formed to forge Canadian $2.00 notes in Boston, Massachusetts and transport them to Nova Scotia for distribution. In Halifax, Laura Davis begins her litany to her daughters to never marry an Englishman, as a result of her husband Lewis' complicity in the counterfeiting scheme and his affair with another woman. Drawn into the illegal enterprise by his financial and marital difficulties, Lewis William Davis finds himself as the principal of the Boston group formed to print the 1897 Canadian banknotes. Using the daily notes of United States Secret Service agent Owen Owen, which were uncovered by the popular television show Ancestors in the Attic, as well as newspaper accounts of that time period, "Never Marry an Englishman" tells the story of Lewis William Davis' attempt to become richer from his counterfeiting skills and of agent Owen Owen's attempt to capture him.

 

 

NO CORNER BOYS HERE

No Corner Boys Here is the story of two families caught up in a swirl of political, economic, and social dramas not of their own making. The author, Jean Crozier, uncovers forgotten or little-known facts about these people who bore the brunt of global happenings.

NO WAY BACK HOME

The Unexpected Life of a Czech Family in India (1938-1977)

 

In 1938, when faced with a decision to work at a shoe company in India or stay in Czechoslovakia and wait for another war, Miki Hruska s newly married parents opted to move, thinking they would return home in a few years. But they would not be able to return  home  for another four decades; instead, home became Calcutta, where they raised their family and established a business during a parade of turbulent social and political events. The ill-planned departure of the British from India and their bungled attempts at Partition engendered riots and killings that brought bloodshed to the family s front door. And when the Communists took over the government of West Bengal, they brought labour disruptions that made it next to impossible to operate the family business. This riveting family memoir is set during the cataclysmic events of WWII and its aftermath, giving a harrowing yet heartwarming portrait of life for a migrant Czech family and showing how perseverance and love can sustain people through the darkest of times.

OLD STRATHCONA EDMONTON'S SOUTHSIDE ROOTS

"Old Strathcona: Edmonton's Southside Roots" by Monto is an extensively researched chronological history of southside Edmonton, once the separate city of Strathcona, from its start as a scattering of Metis/Indian pioneer cabins in the 1870s to a bustling commercial/industrial/residential section of the City of Edmonton prior to the downturn of the 1930s. Bound together with "Metis Strathcona" by Lawrence, a ground-breaking essay on the roots of Strathcona, which delineates the Metis identity of many of its earliest pioneers and the Metis pioneers' connection with the area's Papaschase Indian band, which was subsequently thoroughly dispossessed.

 

PROTEST AND PROGRESS

Rice Sheppard, Harry Ainlay, Margaret Crang... three Edmontonians who stood up and fought for the working people of their city through the dark days of the World Wars, the fragile prosperity of the 1920s, the grinding poverty of the Dirty Thirties and Cold War repression.

 

Rice Sheppard, Harry Ainlay and Margaret Crang did not win all their battles but they made a difference in the history of the city, the province and the country.

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